Monthly Archives: November 2013

Random Humor for your Hump Day

Random humor – Enjoy!

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Art made from Cutting Wire Mesh

Ephemeral Portraits Cut from Layers of Wire Mesh by Seung Mo Park

source:  http://www.stumbleupon.com/su/1ikp5m/:1KMMlKwsV:blC0PgpH/www.thisiscolossal.com/2012/04/ephemeral-portraits-cut-from-layers-of-wire-mesh-by-seung-mo-park/

Using a process that could be the new definition of meticulous, Korean sculptor Seung Mo Park creates giant ephemeral portraits by cutting layer after layer of wire mesh. Each work begins with a photograph which is superimposed over layers of wire with a projector, then using a subtractive technique Park slowly snips away areas of mesh. Each piece is several inches thick as each plane that forms the final image is spaced a few finger widths apart, giving the portraits a certain depth and dimensionality that’s hard to convey in a photograph, but this video on YouTube shows it pretty well. Park just exhibited this month at Blank Space Gallery in New York as part of his latest series Maya (meaning “illusion” in Sanskrit). You can see much more at West Collects. (art newswest collectslavinia tribiani)

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Dino-era water trapped under impact crater

Dino-era water trapped under impact crater

By Tim Wall

Published November 19, 2013

Discovery News 

 If you’ve ever searched for dinos on the Internet, chances are, you’ve come across the drawings of Nobu Tamura. What began as a hobby in 2006, when he realized most dinosaurs on Wikipedia had no photos due to copyright, Tamura is now one of the most prolific producers of up-to-date paleo critters on the web. He’s shared with us his 19 favorite. For his complete works, check out his blog.

More than one kilometer beneath the Chesapeake Bay in Virginia, geologists discovered 100- to 150-million-year-old water from the Atlantic Ocean’s infancy. The ancient water hid under a more recent 56-mile-wide crater left after a massive rock or block of ice nailed the Earth near what is now the entrance to the bay.

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) hydrologists didn’t know the water beneath the crater dated from dino days until they analyzed the chemicals in the water. The water held forms of chloride and bromide, along with other chemicals, that allowed the scientists to estimate the water’s age. And while older water is known from Canada, the Chesapeake Bay impact water is now the oldest large body of water known on the planet.

“Previous evidence for temperature and salinity levels of geologic-era oceans around the globe have been estimated indirectly from various types of evidence in deep sediment cores,” said lead author Ward Sanford, USGS research hydrologist, in a press release. “In contrast, our study identifies ancient seawater that remains in place in its geologic setting, enabling us to provide a direct estimate of its age and salinity.” Sanford and colleagues published their findings in the journal Nature.

The ancient water contained twice the salt content of the modern ocean and dates from the early Cretaceous Period, when dinosaurs dominated the planet and the newborn north Atlantic was more of a lake than an ocean.

In the late Jurassic Period, 150 million years ago, pieces of the Earth’s crust, called tectonic plates, split to divide Europe from North America and Africa. This split formed a rift basin filled with extremely salty water that would later become the Atlantic Ocean. However the Atlantic would have to wait 50 million years until the mid-Cretaceous for a space to open between what is now Central and South America, just as the narrow Strait of Gibraltar now allows the Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea to mingle.

Before the north Atlantic connected with the rest of the world’s waters, some of that briny water became trapped underground beneath a coastal plain and isolated. The water remained largely unchanged until approximately 35 million years ago when a meteor or comet slammed into the Earth during the late Eocene Epoch. That impact created massive tsunamis that swept far inland and devastated the Atlantic coast of North America, yet helped to preserve the Cretaceous ocean water.

The process that made the infant north Atlantic so salty can still be seen today. The Dead Sea contains extremely salt water because more water evaporates out of the sea than flows into it. The Uyuni salt flats of Bolivia serve as an example of what happens when an inland sea completely dries out. Even the Mediterranean nearly became a salt flat during a period from 5.96 to 5.33 million years ago when the sea’s connection to the Atlantic intermittently closed.

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Insanely difficult – Man Does Artwork with Rubik’s Cubes

Dream Big by Peter Fecteau

by DANILO on Nov 3, 2011

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Dream Big by Peter Fecteau“Dream Big” was a year-long project in which Pete created a mosaic of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. using 4,242 Rubik’s Cubes.

petefecteau.com

Dream Big by Peter Fecteau

Dream Big by Peter Fecteau

Dream Big by Peter Fecteau

Dream Big by Peter Fecteau

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Cute Dogs for Your Monday Blues

Cute dogs for your Monday Blues:

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Gloomy English City Builds an Artificial Sun

A Gloomy English City Builds an Artificial Sun

Rejoice, Britons who haven’t seen daylight in ages and who are slowly weakening into rubbery schlumps for want of Vitamin D: Your country now has slightly more light, thanks to a blazing artificial sun made from the “world’s largest spherical balloon.”

The 46-foot-wide ersatz star floats above a square in Durham, in the northeast, as part of a celebration of light art called Lumiere. It portrays a strikingly accurate representation of the Sun’s plasma-storm-scarred surface, only at a scale that’s 100 million times smaller. Canadian techno-artist Rafael Lozano-Hemmer whipped the thing together by first forcing a gravitational collapse inside a molecular cloud, and then having the matter condense into a heavy ball … wait, no, he actually filled a orbicular blimp with helium and animated it with five projectors fed with the latest NASA information. (It’s quite a bit more sophisticated than that artificial Moon planned for Brooklyn.)

The artist writes:

The solar animation on the balloon is generated by live mathematical equations that simulate the turbulence, flares and sunspots that can be seen on the surface of the Sun. This produces a constantly changing display that never repeats itself, giving viewers a glimpse of the majestic phenomena that are observable at the solar surface and that only relatively recent advances in astronomy have discovered. The project uses the latestSOHO and SDO solar observatory imaging available from NASA, overlaid with live animations derived from Navier-Stokes, reaction diffusion, perlin, particle systems and fractal flame equations.

As if that wasn’t cool enough, there’s an app you can download that lets you spawn different patterns in the fiery atmosphere. (You might have to be in Durham, though.) Check out this fantastic screenshot – watch out, our planet is about to crash into the Sun!

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Been Down with a Virus Today

Sorry all for the slow posts.  I like to aim for three posts each day that are completely unrelated, hoping that at least one will strike the fancy of each of you awesome followers.  Today I’ve been down with what I hope is a short duration cold.  Drinking fluids, taking zinc and sleeping.  I will post a bit of sunshine, of sorts, for today.  Wish me luck!

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