Tag Archives: lost cities

A farmer’s story of moles could have led to lost city

(Stuart Wilson)

(Stuart Wilson)

Stuart Wilson says people thought he was crazy when he gambled $39,000—his life savings—on a 4.6-acre field in Wales. Having heard a farmer’s story about moles digging up bits of pottery on the land, the amateur archaeologist tells the Guardian he had a hunch that something important lay beneath, and when the parcel went on the market in 2004, he bought it.

Now, it looks like his bet is paying off: He believes his land is sitting atop the lost city of Trellech—Wales’ largest city in the 13th century, reports the BBC—and the Guardian reports his theory is starting to gain traction.

Wilson, a former toll collector who got his undergrad degree in archaeology, estimates the project has cost more than $200,000, funded in part through donations (you can be an archaeologist for a day for $61).

With help from some 1,000 volunteers, Wilson says he has so far discovered eight buildings, and he intends to spend 2017 working on the remains of what he believes is a manor house surrounded by a moat.

In 2006, he told Archaeology.org that excavating the field “will probably take about 50 years, so basically the rest of my life.” As for the history of the site, it was founded by the de Clare family in the 1200s as a hub that produced iron weapons and armor, and its population exploded.

Per Wilson, in just 25 years it grew to 10,000 people—a quarter of London’s size, though Wilson points out it took London 250 years to amass its 40,000 people.

The BBC reports the de Clares’ settlement is thought to have been destroyed in 1296. (Read about the seven biggest archaeology finds of 2016.)

This article originally appeared on Newser: Man Follows Hunch, Says He Has Uncovered Lost City

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Five lost cities that have been found

August 27th, 2014
Archeologists have recently discovered a lost Mayan city in the Mexican jungle — so here are five lost cities you need to know about.

1. Lagunita
An archeologist from Research Center of the Slovenian Academy of Sciences and Arts rediscovered the lost Mayan city of Lagunita. He identified a Mayan doorway, the remains of massive buildings, plazas, ball courts, a pyramid and three altars that date back to 711 AD. How cool is that?

Monster

2. Helike
In the year 373 BC, a giant earthquake hit off the coast of Greece, which created a giant tsunami that swallowed the ancient city of Helike. Then, in 2001 a team finally rediscovered Helike, digging up coins, pottery and ruins. The reason it took them so long to find it, was because they were looking in the water, but it was under dirt! The water had dried up!

real-atlantis-3

3. Troy
Yes, the famous city of Troy was once lost. In fact, a lot of people thought in never existed. But then, Heinrich Schliemann went on quite adventure in 1870, following clues laid out in Homer’s the Iliad and dug that city up.

troy

4. Pavlopetri
This is the real life Atlantis. Thes 5,000-year-old lost city was found in 1967 and is thought to have been submerged about 3,000 years ago. So, it had a good run. Archeologists found roads, buildings, courtyards and pottery.

Pavlopetri1

5. Machu Picchu
Maybe the greatest lost city sits on top of a mountain in Peru. It wasn’t rediscovered until 1911 mostly because of its location. People are always digging for lost cities, or trekking through the jungle. No one thinks to look up.

machu-picchu-peru

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Cold War images spill new secrets: Lost cities

Cold War images spill new secrets: Lost cities

coronoa atlas.jpg

An image from the website.CORONA.CAST.UARK.EDU

The Middle East is home to 4,500 archaeological sites, or so we thought. An in-depth review of Cold War-era photos taken by spy satellites has pulled back the veil on as many as 10,000 more lost cities, roads, and other ruins in the region.

As Gizmodo reports, CORONA served as the code name for America’s first use of photographic spy satellites, and was in operation from 1960 to 1972.

Its name lives on in the new CORONA Atlas of the Middle East, which made its debut Thursday at the annual gathering of the Society for American Archaeology and revealed “completely unknown” sites via some of the 188,000 declassified photos taken during the mission’s final five years, reports National Geographic.

Archaeologist Jesse Casana of the University of Arkansas describes some of the sites as “gigantic,” with two sprawling over more than 123 acres; Casana suspects the largest, which appear to include aged walls and citadels, were Bronze Age cities.

And as he explains, the photos’ age matters. Though current satellites produce images superior to these grainy decades-old ones, “we can’t see a site that someone has covered up with a building,” and the fact that they were taken before cities like Iraq’s Mosul and Jordan’s Amman swelled makes them invaluable.

The CORONA site explains that the mission’s satellites snapped images “of most of the Earth’s surface” (images whose film strips were, in a great detail noted byNational Geographic, sent back to Earth via parachute-topped buckets) and archaeologists plan to also review areas like Africa and China.

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