Tag Archives: airship

Steampunk Cosplay and a few gadgets…

A Steampunk edition of cosplay for your weekend…

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1835: Mackintosh’s Aerial Ship “Drawn by Eagles”

1835: Mackintosh’s Aerial Ship “Drawn by Eagles”

 Amanda

 August 25, 2013

 1800-1899, Transport

Mackintoshs-Aerial-Ship-Drawn-by-Eagles

Source: The Internet Archive

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The Aluminum Airship of the Future Has Finally Flown

The Aluminum Airship of the Future Has Finally Flown

There was once a time when man looked to the skies and expected to see giant balloons rather than airplanes drifting above. The Hindenburg Disaster promptly put an end to those dreams. But nearly a century later, one company may have finally figured out how to build a dirigible suitable for the 21st century. Just don’t call it a blimp.

This fully rigid airship, dubbed the Aeroscraft, differs fundamentally from, say, the Goodyear blimp. Blimps, by definition, have no internal structure and maintain their shapes only through the pressure of the gas they contain; when the gas escapes, they deflate like the gigantic balloons they are. Rigid airships, like zeppelins before them, maintain their shape regardless of gas pressure thanks to an internal skeleton structure—the Hindenburg utilized highly flammable balsa wood, but the Aeroscraft’s is made of aluminum and carbon fiber—and maintains its buoyancy with a series of gas-filled bladders. And unlike hybrid airships, the Aeroscraft doesn’t require forward momentum to generate lift via a set of wings. It’s all helium power.

The Aeroscraft has been under development by Aeros Corp, the world’s largest airship and blimp maker, since 1996. The project has received over $35 million in R&D funds and the government has even lent the company a couple of NASA boffins to help develop the aerodynamics and control systems. And with the successful launch of its half-scale prototype, the Pelican, last weekend, the investment looks to have paid off. The future of lighter-than-air travel looks to be imminently upon us.

The Aluminum Airship of the Future Has Finally Flown

At 266 feet long and 97 feet wide, the Pelican prototype is just about half the size of what a full-scale Aeroscraft will be. If completed the Aeroscraft will measure more than 400 feet long and be capable of lifting 66 tons or more.

Unlike blimps that maintain a constant buoyancy and rely on ballast and fans to adjust their altitude, the Aeroscraft will employ a unique bladder system that can alter the craft’s static heaviness (relative to air) at will, dubbed COSH (Control of Static Heaviness). The system actually works quite similarly to how submarines use compressed air to float.

The Aeroscraft is equipped with a series of pressurized helium tanks. When the pilot wants to increase altitude, non-flammable helium is released from the tanks through a series of pipes and control valves, into internal gas-bladders called helium pressure envelopes (HPEs). This increases the amount of lift the helium generates, reduces the craft’s static heaviness, and allows it to rise. When the pilot wants to descend, the process is reversed. This allows the Aeroscraft to easily land and take on cargo or passengers without having to be tied down or add external ballast. Additionally, the Aeroscraft will be equipped with a trio of engines—one on each side and a third on the belly—and six turbofan engines to provide thrust and augment the COSH’s lift, as well as aerodynamic tail-fin rudders and stumpy wing control surfaces, for high speed travel—that is, above 20 mph. Oh it’ll get you there, it’s just going to take a while.

Now, the US government didn’t drop $35 million just to build a better balloon. Airship technology is being developed to provide a vital role in modern world: runway-less cargo delivery. Getting even modest amounts of supplies and people to remote areas by plane can be a nightmare; you’ve either got to find a suitable runway or be prepared to parachute. From the Australian outback to the Alaskan hinterlands, there are plenty of locations around the world that are simply inaccessible to conventional airplanes. Not so with the Aeroscraft.

The Aluminum Airship of the Future Has Finally Flown

With a proposed lifting capability of 66 tons and no need for a landing strip, these airships should be able to deliver just about anything just about anywhere in the world. Cargo can either be loaded into the Aeroscraft’s internal cargo bay or slung under the blimp using the company’s proprietary ceiling suspension cargo deployment (CSCD) system. which automatically balances the hanging load to prevent it from swinging around and crashing the dirigible.

While the Pelican successfully lifted off last Sunday, it did so under cautionary tethers. Its first untethered flight is expected to happen within the next few weeks. Eventually, the company hopes to produce a trio of Aeroscraft models: the 66-ton capacity ML866, the 250-ton ML868, and the 500-ton ML86X. There’s even discussion of turning them into giant floating hotels for serene 80-day global circumnavigations.

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Steampunk Aircrew

This is another recurring post on my blog of potential Steampunk Airship crew.  Please select crew for your next airship.  You can’t pick them all.  Keep in mind what purpose your ship will have – pirate, merchant, explorer, trader, military vessel, world conquest…etc.

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1898: Comedy Musical Called “The Air Ship”

c. 1898:

The Air Ship: A musical farce comedy

The-Air-Ship-620x923

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More Steampunk Aircrew

A regular feature of the blog is to post great pictures of steampunk enthusiasts.  Steampunk being a science fiction, or a “historical future” in the Age of Steam, roughly 1830 to 1900 or so, usually British or American Wild Western themed.  So, ready to hire crew for your airship?  You decide if you want heroes, military, pirates, merchants, explorers or whatever.  You can’t hire them all, so who would you pick?  (For earlier posts, type “steampunk aircrew” into the search box on the home page.  I think this is the seventh post.) (photographers, if any of these are your work, please send me your information so I can credit you, or if you wish, so I can remove it from my site.  This is an unpaid site and I get my pictures from Facebook, emails and so forth, so often I do not know the original source.  Thanks)

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Steampunk Airship Crew #6

Having just returned from the amazing Wild Wild West Con 2, the Steampunk Convention at Old Tucson Studios, I have to put up more Steampunk pictures.  I had a great panel with myself, friends Patti Hulstrand and Chris Wilke.  Kudos to Diana, Jason, and Noe on throwing a great convention that was tons of fun.  Built up some wife points when I purchased Becky the whole set of original Con versions of Lady Mechanika – yes Joe Benitez was there!  They were all signed and packaged, but he was nice enough to further personalize each “to Becky.”  There was also a booth selling amazingly well made corsets for just $60.  My wife went to get one, feeling a bit guilty after I had already spoiled her, but unfortunately they did not have her size in the color she wanted.

I met so many amazing new people there is not really time to list them all.  Thanks again to those who invited me out as a guest to speak on a panel about Steampunk and writing!  Thanks also to Davina and Kathleen, who were there at the panel, and purchased The Travelers’ Club and the Ghost Ship!  I hope you enjoy it immensely!

Now, to the aircrew.  The ones in the desert are most likely from WWWC2.  I will be sprinkling them over time.  You are now ready to pick the crew and staff for your sixth airship in your burdgeoning fleet.  Do you want a merchant vessel, an explorer, a pirate ship, a military vessel, a ship for world domination, or other purposes?  Choose your crew wisely.  You cannot pick more than eight.

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